Author: acc945

William Heath Byford: A Medical School Founder

In recognition of the start of the new academic year at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, which officially launches with the celebration of Founders’ Day in mid-August, we share a series of biographies of our school’s founders.   William Heath Byford (1817-1890) was a pioneer in the medical education of women and was one of the organizers of the Woman’s Hospital Medical College, later Northwestern University Woman’s Medical School.   Dr. Byford was almost wholly self-educated. He attended school for three or four years, until the death of his father forced him, at nine years old, to abandon education and enter the working world to support his mother and two older siblings. Then, at the age of eighteen, he determined that he wanted to become a physician and began studying under Dr. Joseph Maddox. He soon passed the Indiana State Medical Board examination and was admitted to practice in August 1838. Shortly thereafter, he moved to Mount Vernon and ran a prominent surgical practice for a decade. During this time, he studied medicine and graduated from the Ohio Medical College.   In 1850, he was called to chair the anatomy department at the Evansville Medical College in Indiana; he stayed at Evansville until the institution closed in 1856. Dr. Byford continued to practice medicine in Evansville until he was called to chair the Department of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women...

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Edmund Andrews, a Medical School Founder

In recognition of the start of the new academic year at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, which officially launches with the celebration of Founders’ Day in mid-August, we share a series of biographies of our school’s founders.   Edmund Andrews (1824-1904) was born in Putney, Vermont. Although as a youth he worked on his father’s farm to help support his family, his first priority was to excel in school. He studied diligently to gain admittance to the sophomore class of the University of Michigan in 1846. After receiving his bachelor’s degree, he entered the Medical Department of the University of Michigan as part of its first class. Immediately after receiving his medical degree in 1852, Dr. Andrews became a demonstrator of anatomy, and then a year later was made professor of comparative anatomy at his alma mater.   In 1855, he was appointed demonstrator of anatomy in Rush Medical College, but resigned after one year and devoted himself to medical practice. Soon after his arrival in Chicago he aided in founding the Chicago Academy of Science, and was its first president, serving several times in this capacity. A short time after this, in connection with Dr. Horace Wardner, he helped established a charity dispensary and a private dissecting room, where he taught a class in anatomy.   During his time at the University of Michigan, Dr. Andrews had published...

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2015 Marks 100th Anniversary of Dr. James Eckenhoff’s Birth

James Edward Eckenhoff, MD, was born on April 2, 1915, in Easton, Maryland. He attended Transylvania College (Lexington, Ky) and the University of Kentucky before going on to attend the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 1941. There, he decided to specialize in anesthesiology. Throughout his long career, Dr. Eckenhoff made considerable contributions to the field of anesthesia in particular and to medicine in general. After 21 years at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Eckenhoff came to Northwestern in 1966. In addition to joining the medical school faculty as a professor, Dr. Eckenhoff also organized an autonomous Department...

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African American Medical and Dental Pioneers- Part 4

In recognition of Black History Month, during the four weeks of February, we are sharing weekly spotlights of African American graduates from Northwestern’s medical and dental schools. These alumni made significant contributions to the field of medicine, forging the way for many generations to come. Information provided by the Galter Health Sciences Library. Library Notes, 2014. ——————————————————— Olive Myrtle Henderson, 1908 DDS, a native of Chicago was born in 1877. As a young woman, Dr. Henderson was inspired by her dentist, Ida Gray Nelson Rollins, DDS, graduate of the University of Michigan in 1890. Dr. Nelson Rollins was the first female African American dental graduate in the United States. Following Dr. Nelson Rollins’ example, Dr. Henderson completed her dental education at Northwestern University Dental School and graduated in 1908. She was the first female African American to graduate from Northwestern with a dental degree and the second female African American to practice dentistry in Chicago. Dr. Henderson married Thomas Sterling Officer, MD, in June 1911. She opened a private practice on the South Side in 1912, and was active in the National Association of Colored Women and in her church, St. Thomas Episcopal, on South Wabash Avenue. She retired in 1948 after 40 years in practice and died June 14, 1957. For more information on this and other history blog entries, please contact Galter Health Sciences Library...

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African American Medical and Dental Pioneers- Part 3

In recognition of Black History Month, during the four weeks of February, we are sharing weekly spotlights of African American graduates from Northwestern’s medical and dental schools. These alumni made significant contributions to the field of medicine, forging the way for many generations to come. Information provided by the Galter Health Sciences Library. Library Notes, 2014. ——————————————————— Emma Ann Reynolds, 1895 MD (1862-1917), was a graduate of Wilberforce University and the Provident Hospital Training School for Nurses (1892), and received her MD in 1895 from the Northwestern University Woman’s Medical School. It was after Ms. Reynolds asked Daniel Hale Williams, 1883...

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