Author: cim417

Training at the Chicago Maternity Center

Alumnus Tim Hunter, MD ’68, sent Ward Rounds journal entries from his training days as a fourth-year medical student, serving for two weeks at the Chicago Maternity Center. Here we share some excerpts and invite you to tell us about your experiences. In addition, alumnus David Kerns, MD ’68, is writing a book about his experiences at the CMC that is due out in 2013. “Fortnight on Maxwell Street:  A Novel” is “true fiction,” a medical student’s trial-by-fire delivering babies in Chicago’s housing projects and tenements in the early spring of 1968. It is a tale of fear and courage, choice and consequence, set amid extreme poverty and racial tension in the days immediately preceding and following the assassination of Martin Luther King.   January 14, 1968 Getting off the “L” at Halsted was very weird – nobody around, fresh snow by the Circle campus, and a sinking feeling in my stomach. At 9:05 I arrived at the Maternity Center, a dump of a building at the corner of Newbury and Maxwell. Dr. Jack Casper oriented us as to our duties and then turned us over to Jane, a nurse who talked for 2-3 hours on the setups and equipment we would be using. About this time, I volunteered to go out with Jack and Betty Lou for a call concerning a para XIII, gr XII who was bleeding....

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Memories of Loyal Davis, MD

Submitted by James J. Monge’, MD ’55 (Excerpts from 4-page letter written April 5, 2012.) We encourage other alums to share their recollections of Loyal Davis, MD, who was named chair of the Department of Surgery at Northwestern in 1933 and remained in that post until 1963. He inspired and trained many physicians and surgeons during his years at Northwestern. He achieved emeritus status in 1964.   My relationships with Dr. Loyal Davis tended to alternate with each year I was at Northwestern Medical Center, as you will gather from the following: In the first quarter of school, all freshman students were required to arrive at the medical school at 8 a.m. dressed in jacket, shirt, and tie to meet with Dr. Davis. Students were asked to stand, introduce themselves, share where they had grown up and which college they had attended. When I was called upon, I mentioned having graduated from the University of Chicago. Dr. Davis immediately launched into a long dismissal of the U of C based on the chancellor who had canceled football… . I with some temerity stated that I liked the University of Chicago and thought I had received an excellent education. Looking displeased, Dr. Davis brought out a notebook, asked me to spell my name, and wrote it down. Needless to say, I regretted saying anything, although, nothing ever came of it....

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Seven Decades of Dedication – Dr. Leslie Arey

Earlier this year, Michael Sawaya, MD ’68, sent a suggestion for a future topic for the Ward Rounds history blog. “Would enjoy something of the career of Leslie B. Arey. Dr Arey taught embryology to first-year medical students when I was there (class 1968). He wrote of the history of the medical school but he has been gone a while and I think alumni would enjoy a recounting of his great career.” We thank Dr. Sawaya for the opportunity to share this wonderful story about the Northwestern career of Dr. Leslie B. Arey, PhD, who touched the lives of so many people at the medical school over a career spanning more than seven decades. In some cases, he had taught three generations of students from the same family.  Sadly, he passed away in 1988. There were two very nice Ward Rounds pieces written by editor Ellen Soo Hoo about Dr. Arey in the 1980s. Here are excerpts from those articles. Dr. Arey joined the medical school faculty in 1915 as an instructor in anatomy, after receiving a PhD degree from Harvard University. The Maine native intended to stay just a couple of years and then find a job teaching zoology at a liberal arts college. But he quickly rose through the academic ranks to become a full professor in 1919 and five years later the department chairman, a post...

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Breaking Gender Barriers at Northwestern

Piece done by Amy Cross from Northwestern News Network – 10/05/11 Dr. Margaret Gerber graduated from Northwestern University in 1939 and from the medical school in 1944.  Decades after her graduation, Gerber, who goes by the name “Mickey,” still calls Evanston home. “I’ve lived here since basically 1937,” she says. “How many years is that?” Growing up during the depression, Mickey and her family moved to where the work was – Utah, Iowa and finally to Evanston, where her brother Jay was acting as the new student director for Northwestern. Mickey enrolled at Northwestern as a senior and graduated in 1939 with degrees in math and chemistry. “I always kind of secretly wanted to be a doctor,” she says. “I never told my family that because I didn’t think it would be possible in the depression era time.” She decided to pursue that dream after all when she applied to Northwestern University’s medical school. “I was interviewed by the professor of anatomy,” she remembers. “This was in 1940. He said, ‘We know how to pick men, but we have no idea how to pick women.’” She recalls his joke about her gender. “When we pick women, we just throw the applications up in the air and the first four we take.” She laughed, “At least I had the luck of the drop.” After being accepted with a full-ride scholarship, the...

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Preserving the Medical School’s History for Future Generations

In recognition of the medical school’s 150th anniversary in 2009, the Galter Health Sciences Library began identifying certain materials to be scanned and digitized. By digitizing selected, unique materials in the Library’s collections and placing them on the Web, access is enhanced and preservation is improved. Previously these items were only available to a select group of researchers. Making high-quality digital images available electronically can reduce wear and tear on fragile items. One of the completed projects is Dr. Leslie B. Arey’s history, Northwestern University Medical School 1859-1979. It is now available for alumni and friends. Thanks to support from the Northwestern University Library’s Digital Collections-2E Digital Media Lab , which processed class photos from the 1920s through 2009, and David Darian, who processed the older photographs, the Class Composite Digitization Project is nearing completion. Conditions of the older composite photos varied from very poor to excellent. In several cases, the Galter Library held the individual portraits only, as the backing material on the composite images had long since disintegrated. Through the magic of new technology, each composite was carefully cleaned and enhanced, producing facsimiles better than the originals. The Galter Library is still trying to locate class pictures from the following years: 1921, 1922, 1925, 1928, 1930, 1932, 1967, 1972, and 1975-1989. If you or someone you know has access to medical school photos from any of these years,...

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