Media Spotlight

A LAB ACCIDENT LEADS TO BIOACTIVE ‘TISSUE PAPER

SMITHSONIAN

Adam Jakus, then a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Ramille Shah, PhD, assistant professor of Surgery and Materials Science, was working with the biological “ink” the lab uses to 3-D print ovaries. Standing beneath the lab’s fume hood, Jakus knocked over the container, spilling it onto the lab bench. By the time he went to clean it up, it had formed a solid sheet. “It felt great,” Jakus said. “If you make a new biomaterial and you can’t pick it up or it falls apart when you pick it up, it’s useless. I had this lightbulb go off — ‘we can do this with all the other tissues we’re working with in our lab.’”

CANCER IS ‘NATURAL.’ THE BEST TREATMENTS FOR IT AREN’T

STAT

“In the early years of my career as an oncologist, I’m learning that you really remember the patients you can’t save. Those with essentially curable cancers who refused the right treatment stand out the most,” wrote Suneel Kamath, MD, a hematology/oncology fellow at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. “It is human nature to believe that anything that is ‘all natural’ is intrinsically good…. [But] making a decision about treating cancer shouldn’t be based solely on a natural versus unnatural algorithm. We should focus on making choices that realistically have the best chance to help us. Sometimes, the ‘unnatural’ option is the best one.”

NORTHWESTERN TO OFFER HOME-BASED HEALTH TRAINING

CRAIN’S CHICAGO BUSINESS

In a move to serve Chicago’s growing number of seniors and to reduce costs for Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Feinberg will soon offer a program that trains doctors on how to provide home-based primary care. Feinberg has been working with Schaumburg-based Home Centered Care Institute for the past year to develop a program that will coach up to 40 doctors, physician assistants, social workers and nurse practitioners. “Ultimately, being in your own home is where most seniors want to be. With home-based primary care, it allows physicians to meet that need,” said Lee Lindquist, ’00 MD, ’03 ’05 GME, ’05 MPH, ’10 MBA, chief of Geriatrics, who leads the initiative.

HEART BENEFIT OF ALCOHOL NOT SEEN IN PEOPLE WITH LIVER DISEASE

REUTERS 

Light to moderate drinkers may have a lower risk of heart disease than teetotalers, but a new study suggests this doesn’t hold true for people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Investigators examined data on 5,115 adults aged 18 to 30, following them for up to 25 years. “We failed to find any association between moderate alcohol use and multiple different markers of heart disease and heart disease risks, including blood pressure, cholesterol or calcium deposits in the arteries of the heart [in a sample of individuals with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease],” said lead study author Lisa VanWagner, MD, ’11 MSc, ’10, ’11, ’14, ‘15 GME, assistant professor of Medicine and Preventive Medicine.