Dr. Peter Gibbons, a second-year resident (Daniel O’Brien, M2, a second-year medical student), rushed to work Monday morning only to be chastised by his overbearing attending Dr. Bill Lumbergh (Patrick Hurley, M2) and annoyed by medical student Milton Waddams (Ralph Cook, M2). He goes about his routine with “a case of the Mondays,” inundated with paperwork.

This opening scene kicked off the medical school’s 35th annual sketch comedy show In Vivo, held Friday and Saturday, November 15 and 16. The performance of “Office Space, MD,” parodied the characters and plot of the film Office Space, following Gibbons and his friends Dr. Atul Gawande (Rajat Verma, M2) and Sam Nagheenanajar (Samaa Kemal, M1) as they scheme to take down the hospital.

Along the way, healthcare quality and patient safety consultants (Crystal Doan and Addie Boone, M2) threaten to cut costs for the hospital, and Gibbons falls in love with Protein Bar employee Joanna (Amy Blood, M1).

(Left to right) Medical students Blake Platt, Daniel O’Brien, Samma Kemal, and Rajat Verma star in the 35th annual student sketch comedy show In Vivo, which spoofed the film Office Space.

(Left to right) Medical students Blake Platt, Daniel O’Brien, Samma Kemal, and Rajat Verma star in the 35th annual student sketch comedy show In Vivo, which spoofed the film Office Space.

Gibbons sees an occupational hypnotherapist who puts him into a relaxed state where he remains aloof and not caring. When he finds out his friends will be laid off, they devise a plan to release a computer virus to steal money from the hospital.

The student group DOCappella showcased contemporary songs during act one of the show.

Due to a glitch in the virus, they find they have stolen thousands of dollars overnight instead of over a long period of time. Gibbons decides to take the blame for it and leaves his confession letter at the financial building. Before the letter is picked up, Milton, tired of being bullied, sets fire to the building, saving Gibbons and his friends.

In the end, Gibbons learns that he cannot get caught up in the little things in life and opens his own practice.

Student group DOCappella

Student vocal group DOCappella performed at In Vivo.

The cast also featured M2 students John Cooper, Jacqueline Godbe, and Prince Nzeata, and M1 students Chase Anderson, Michael Colacci, Courtney Hager, and Blake Platt.

In addition to the main story, the show featured the student group DOCappella singing “Faith is the Bird That Feels the Light” by Elizabeth Alexander, “All Night Long” by Lionel Ritchie, and “Thinkin’ Bout You/Mirrors” by Frank Ocean and Justin Timberlake. The Dance Interest Group performed routines to songs including “Suit and Tie” by Justin Timberlake featuring Jay Z, “Mirotic” by DBSK, and the Bollywood-inspired “Besharam.” This year’s In Vivo also spoofed recent commercials and incorporated pop culture skits.

The producers of In Vivo included M2 students Nitin Goyal, Reid Johnson, David Kaltman, and Manan Mehta. They were supported by assistant producers and M1 students KJ Blair, Kasey Coyne, Johnny Hourmozdi, and Parul Kathuria.

“Everyone comes together for this event. So much work has gone into it and so many people are invested in its success. To see what we wrote and what we planned come to life is great, but also seeing everyone bring their own personality and jokes to the show makes it a cool experience,” said Goyal.

(Left to right) Manan Mehta, M2 and In Vivo producer, and Rajat Verma, M2 and In Vivo actor, talk with alumnus Geoffery Engel, MD’72, GME’79, at the reception following the show.

(Left to right) Manan Mehta, M2 and In Vivo producer, and Rajat Verma, M2 and In Vivo actor, talk with alumnus Geoffery Engel, MD’72, GME’79, at the reception following the show.

This year’s show coincided with the medical school alumni board meeting, and board members were invited to attend the performance.

“I always wanted to come back for In Vivo,” said Geoffery Engel, MD ’72, GME ’79. “The show is fantastic and very professional. I am shocked by how much talent the students have and delighted by the diverse backgrounds and acts showcased. The show has certainly improved since I was at the medical school.”

The event raised nearly $4,000 for Chicago Run, a non-profit organization that organizes free physical activity programs in Chicago Public Schools to promote health and wellness. They are currently in 45 Chicago Public Schools and serve more than 13,000 students.

“I was interested in getting involved in In Vivo because we are creating something that is bigger than ourselves, something that is for the medical school and the greater Chicago community. I think the charity that we chose for the beneficiary speaks to that, in that it is a local charity,” Kaltmann said.